Jenkins

 

Jenkins, formerly known as Hudson, is an extensible open source continuous integration server that simplifies the process between development and deployment.

I am installing it for our Windows development environment running Git, MSBuild and perl scripts to do the build.  Here are some things that helped getting it working.

Links:

Blogs:

Videos:

Open Data Hack Night (10/15/15)

Open data has finally come to Allegheny County and the City of Pittsburgh. You’re invited to celebrate the launch of the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center at the community launch event.


Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center (WPRDC) – http://www.wprdc.org/ , a site for public data sets in the Pittsburgh Region.
Looked at some cool data sets including:

 

SSH on Windows

 

 

 

 

 

Server Fault: SSH / SCP Server on Windows (http://serverfault.com/questions/10468/ssh-scp-server-on-windows)

Successfully connected from putty. Note: With a domain account it needs to be connected to talk to the domain controller. Use the format \ or @

Could not connect to the BitVise SSHD server from the Git Extensions Bash shell.   With the error:

Terminal initialization failure. See server logs for more info.
Hint: Try requesting a different terminal environment.
Connection to localhost closed.

It turns out that this is a problem with the terminal type in the Bash shell which defaults to ‘msys’. I found the solution at ServerFault, Is it possible to change value of $TERM when calling ssh?. Set TERM=vt220.

When connecting from Git Extenstions to the server the first time you may get the error:

The server's host key is not cached in the registry.
You have no guarantee that the server is the computer you think it is.
The server's rsa2 key fingerprint is: ssh-rsa 2048
16:27:ac:a5:76:28:2d:36:63:1b:56:4d:eb:df:a6:48
Connection abandoned. fatal: The remote end hung up unexpectedly

For some reason Plink can't handle setting up a new machine, but if you connect with putty it saves the remote machines information to the registry and everything will work fine thereafter (http://stackoverflow.com/questions/10166173/git-servers-host-key-not-cached-in-registry-github-com).

Resources:

Installing GitExtensions

GitExtensions

Git Extensions is an awesome UI for working with Git in the Windows platform.

To install, download the distribution from http://sourceforge.net/projects/gitextensions/ and run it.  This walk-through is the installation of version 2.48.05.

GitExtensionsSetup

GitExtensionsInstallAllUsers

GitExtensionsRequiredSoftwareGitExtensionsDestinationFolderGitExtensionsCustomSetupGitExtensionsSSHClientGitExtensionsReady

GitExtensionsInstalling

Kdiff3 is a 3-way diff program that is the default diff program for Git Extensions.  It is loaded automatically if you selected it above.

KdiffSetupAgreement

KdiffSetupComponents

KdiffSetupLocation

KdiffSetupAllUsers

KdiffSetupStartMenu

KdiffSetupInstalling

KdiffSetupCompleting

Next sets up Msys Git, the actual Git installation that does all of the processing.

GitSetup

GitLicense

GitComponents

GitPathSetup

Note: I like using Git on the Windows side too, but for GitExtensions you can just use it with Git Bash.  Adding the optional tools is OK if you are a Unix junky, but confusing if you think you are on Microsoft and all of a sudden some of the commands are changing.

GitLineEndings

Note: I’m perhaps conservative here and just stick with how it is since some programs like it different ways.

GitInstalling

GitCompleting

Now Git Extensions runs and makes sure everything looks good:

GitExtensionsSettingChecklist

GitExtensionsCompleted

And now we are ready to start using Git!!!